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Lighthouses

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All of the lighthouses described below have been declared surplus by the federal government. The Municipality has submitted applications and petitions to Parks Canada, asking for these lighthouses to be designated as Heritage Lighthouses under the Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act. 

lighthouse

Killarney East Lighthouse

Location: Red Rock Point, one mile east of Killarney village.
Built: 1909, by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Recognized as a Federal Heritage Building in 1991
Accessible by road: Yes

Excerpt from the Federal Heritage Building Report:
The Tower stands sentinel on the North Channel of Georgian Bay, at Killarney East. The short, sturdy, square-tapered tower features a projecting gallery with handrail topped by a prominent lantern. The designation is confined to the footprint of the building. The Tower is a Recognized Federal Heritage Building because of its historical associations, and its architectural and environmental values.

For more detailed information from the Heritage Building Report, visit www.pc.gc.ca/apps/dfhd/page_fhbro_eng.aspx?id=4433

Note: The current lighthouse is the second one to stand at this location. Its predecessor was built in 1866 in the same square style of the original Killarney West Lighthouse near the west end of Killarney Channel (see below).

Killarney West Lighthouse

Location: One mile northwest of Killarney village, on Partridge Island
Built: 1909, by the Dominion Department of Marine
Custodian: Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Recognized as a Federal Heritage Building in 2001
Accessible by road: No

Excerpt from the Federal Heritage Building Report:
The Lighthouse, also known as the Killarney Northwest Light, is set on an isolated rock
outcrop at the west end of Partridge Island. The sturdy, square-tapered, wooden tower with a projecting gallery supports a polygonal lantern. The designation is confined to the footprint of the building. The Lighthouse is a Recognized Federal Heritage Building because of its historical associations, and its architectural and environmental values.

For more detailed information from the Heritage Building Report, visit www.pc.gc.ca/apps/dfhd/page_fhbro_eng.aspx?id=8846

NOTE: The original lighthouse that was built on this site in 1866 had the distinction of being the first new lighthouse to be lit in Canada after Confederation. It began operations on July 1st, 1867.

Badgeley Island Rear Range Tower

Location: South side of Badgeley Island, southwest of Killarney village  
Built: 1905
Architect: Department of Marine and Fisheries
Custodian: Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Recognized as a Federal Heritage Building in 2006
Accessible by road: No

Excerpt from the Federal Heritage Building Report:
The Rear Range Light Tower, located on Badgeley Island, Ontario, consists of a three-tiered, tapered steel frame, surmounted by a wood watch room and iron lantern. The watch room, equipped with a multi-paned sash window, is clad in cedar shingles and flares at its top into a coved cornice. The gallery above supports an octagonal lantern, itself capped with a sloped roof and vent stack. The tower is painted white and features contrasting red elements and a day mark. The light tower sits on a broken shale rock close to the shoreline and marks the entrance to the North Channel. The designation is confined to the footprint of the building…The Rear Range Light Tower is a Recognized Federal Heritage Building because of its historical associations, and its architectural and environmental values.  

NOTE: The Badgeley Island Lighthouse was located on the south side of Badgeley Island, southwest of Killarney village. It was built in 1912 and dynamited in 1981.

 

Bustard Islands Lighthouses

Location: Island KG.7195, Georgian Bay, Municipality of Killarney
Built: 1893
Custodian: Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (Coast Guard)
Recognized as Federal Heritage Buildings: (Unknown at this time)
Accessible by road: No

The three range lights presently at this location were preceded by two trellis range towers that were built in 1875, as part of the French River range system, to guide vessels to the mouth of the French River. Lumbering and commercial fishing operations in the area greatly benefitted from these navigational aids. The towers were rebuilt in 1893 and a third outer range tower was added.

Note: According to Parks Canada, the Federal Heritage Building Review Office has information about these buildings, but no information about them is available through the online database.